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Welcome to Digital Publishing @ Wake

This site provides electronic access to the full text of WFU publications. You can quickly search the full text and link to individual pages for easy reference and sharing.

Recent Publications

  • The Appalachian Trail: History, Humanity, and Ecology
    Author(s): Robert A. Browne
    Abstract:

    From the introduction...

    The concept of a continuously marked trail along the crest of the Appalachian Mountains was first forwarded in 1921 by a Massachusetts native, Benton MacKay, in an article published in the Journal of the American Institute of Architects. At that time the footpath’s length from Georgia to Maine was envisioned as 1300 miles, but with scenic diversions and reroutes away from private land, the distance grew to more than 2000 miles....

  • Egg Foo Bill
    Author(s): Library Partners Press
    Abstract:

    RECIPES
    YOU HOPE YOUR EXECUTIONERS WILL CONSULT
    AFTER HAVING ASKED WHAT YOU'D LIKE FOR YOUR "LAST MEAL"
    TO WHICH YOU'RE THEORETICALLY ENTITLED
    HAVING BEEN CAUGHT AND CONVICTED AND SENTENCED TO THE DEATH PENALTY
    DESPITE YOUR ONLY CRIME BEING THAT
    YOU SIMPLY LOVED YOUR EGGS TOO MUCH

    Or,

    IF LOVING EGGS IS WRONG,
    YOU DON'T WANT TO BE "WRITE",
    AND SO CAN YOU!

  • Invictus: Hazing and the Future of Black Greek-letter Organizations
    Author(s): Gregory S. Parks
    Abstract:

    Hazing has been a persistent issue within National Pan-Hellenic Council Organizations—the nine, major black Greek-letter organizations (“BGLOs”)—for generations. It is an issue that many of the organizations’ leaders and members as well as commentators and critics believe will result in the ultimate demise of these groups. While BGLO hazing has persisted in some shape or form since the early parts of the 20th Century, efforts to end it have been, largely, fruitless. From the perspective of Gregory S. Parks, JD, PhD—author of Invictus: Hazing and the Future of Black Greek-letter Organizations—a significant reason why hazing within BGLOs has not been curtailed is because the organizations have been ineffective in appreciating the nuances of the issue. In essence, they look at it through the lens of, simply, problematic undergraduates and a handful of enabling alumni members. However, there are myriad of difficult questions that BGLOs must grapple with if they are to make any true progress toward a solution for hazing.

    What is the actual arc and history of hazing, especially within BGLOs? What is the tally of deaths, injuries, institutional sanctions, and both civil and criminal sanctions? Why are members wedded to their beliefs that hazing is either fruitless or fruitful for the longevity of BGLOs? Does it matter what method is used to bring potential members into BGLOs with regard to the extent that they remain committed to their organization and its members? Do factors like personality, impulsivity, and risk awareness influence hazing, and if so, are there solutions that can be drawn from said findings? Are BGLOs more physically violent than their white counterparts? Are BGLO fraternities more violent than BGLO sororities? To what extent do questions about black masculinity and homophobia undergird hazing in BGLO fraternities? Is there a broader culture of rule and law violation, by-stander effect, and demonizing whistle-blowers within BGLOs—seen even at the higher echelons of leadership—that is emblematic of what you find among the undergraduates? Does personality motivate hazing “victims” to seek out victimization? Can “victims” actually consent to hazing? Assuming that they can, what evidence in litigation might be used for an effective defense? Ultimately, are BGLOs on the brink of their demise, and what factors may lend support for this conclusion?

    In sum, this book seeks to answer these, and other, questions.

     

    -- Gregory, S. Parks, J.D., Ph.D., Wake Forest University School of Law

     

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  • Song of Moving Water: A Novel
    Author(s): Susan Schmidt
    Abstract:

    As paddler, flyfisher, bass fiddler, and Quaker naturalist, Susan Schmidt writes about river and forest ecology, bluegrass music, square dancing, chestnut trees, endangered species, local food, and environmental organizing.  An editor and teacher, she paddled Virginia viers and lobbied against dams.

     

    SONG OF MOVING WATER is a young woman's coming-of-age novel. Learning about farming and faith from her Aunt Ruby, about foraging from neighbor Amos, and about reading the river and the Tao of water from Sam, Grace learns to value a self-sufficient farming community, in contrast to her mother's social whirl in Richmond. When Grace skinny dips in a mountain pool, she opens her heart and forgives her own gracelessness. She sings to save the river through her heart's a-busting.

    A print edition of this ebook is also available here.

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  • Intimate Geographies
    Author(s): Joy Elvey Bannerman
    Abstract:

    Poems

    by

    Joy Elvey Bannerman

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  • Provost's Newsletter, February 2015
    Author(s): Provost's Office