166 History of Wake Forest College
was probably where the road crosses the little stream to the northeast
of the Campus. A very large crowd was assembled to witness it.
Professor Armstrong made an address, Rev. T. R. Crocker offered
prayer, and the young men were led down into the water and baptized
by President Wait. They were all dressed in black robes, giving an
imposing appearance and adding to the grandeur, dignity and
solemnity of the occasion. After the ceremony the congregation
repaired to the chapel where the young men who had been baptized
were most affectionately taken into the church, after which the Lord's
Supper was taken.
The Wake Forest Church was first constituted entirely of those who
were members of Wake Forest Institute, one being a professor and all
the others students. The minute of its constitution quoted above shows
that one of its objects was to train the students in church work. It
continued for more than half a century predominantly a student
church. Students filled its offices, looked after its discipline, took an
active part in its public services and the church meetings, and were
among the delegates to the Association and Conventions. The first
clerk was George Washington, who on leaving Wake Forest, in 1836
to become a student of
Yale12
was succeeded by R. M. Noxon, who in
turn was succeeded by W. W. Childers, who continued in that place
during the period of the Institute. The treasurers in order for the same
period were R. M. Noxon and Lewis DuPre. The first deacons were
Hiram K. Person and Willie R. Powell. Having left the Institute they
were succeeded in April, 1836, by W. T. Brooks and James W.
Hoskins, the latter being succeeded in August, 1838, by J. L. Prichard.
The young church was most jealous of the character and good name
of its members. In fact, it undertook to see that no one professing the
name of Christ, whether a member of this church or not, indulged in
things unbecoming a Christian. In accord with a resolution passed in
November, 1835, the deacons closely
―――――――
12
Brooks's Diary.
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