Appendix to Chapter XXI 311
wish the enterprising editor abundant success. His selections on
Agriculture alone are worth more to the farmer than the subscription
price."3
Mr. Palmer, as might be expected of a man of his energetic habits,
was also interested in civil affairs. He was chairman of the Board of
Superintendents of the Common Schools of Caswell County. His
interest in business affairs is shown by the fact that he was President
of the Caswell Mutual Fire Insurance
Company.4
It was in education, however that Mr. Palmer was perhaps most
interested. He took a leading part in the establishment of both the
Milton Female Academy, 1844, and the Milton Male Academy, and
was a strong supporter of both. He was also a prime mover in the
establishment of Oxford Female College, in 1850-51. He was all the
time awake to all that concerned the welfare of all these institutions,
and in frequent communication through the press kept their claims for
support and patronage before the public.
It was as Trustee of Wake Forest College, however, that he did his
greatest work for education. He was elected a Trustee in 1841; from
that time until his death he was a regular attendant on the meetings of
the Board and among its most useful and loyal members. The Board
often made use of his legal services. In 1844 as chairman of a
committee of the Trustees he drew up a form of bequest to Wake
Forest College, which was first published in the Biblical Recorder of
October 4, 1844, and is that to be found today in the College cata-
logue. He was ever devising plans to help the College financially and
to increase the number of its students. It was he, as we have seen, who
brought about the organization of the Education Society and did not
allow interest in it to flag. Knowing the value of publicity he
neglected no occasion to give news of the doings of the College not
only to the denominational papers but also to the secular press. He
never showed signs of being discouraged, but in the darkest hour he
knew how to say a cheering word. He expected great things of Wake
Forest College and considered her worthy of the very best attention
and labors of the very ablest men of the State and nation. He always
talked and wrote of the College in sober yet exalted terms. His early
death was greatly lamented.
―――――――
3
From 1847 until 1854 Mr. Palmer was a frequent contributor to the Biblical
Recorder. His articles embrace every variety of subject relating to religious work,
meetings of the Board, meetings of Associations and Conventions, revivals, new
churches, educational institutions, etc.
4
Biblical Recorder, October 1853.
Previous Page Next Page