386 History of Wake Forest College
demon of intemperance and all its hateful imps of idleness, extravagance and vice
will be driven.
Your friend and ob't serv't.
W. H. OWEN
Wake Forest College, April 5, 1845.
This ended the Presidency of Samuel Wait, but not his connection
with the College. At the meeting of the Board of Trustees in June,
1845, he was elected President of the Board of Trustees, a position
which he held until November 11, 1865, more than twenty years, a
longer period than any other has held the place. His letter of
resignation of the presidency of the Board reveals his great love for
the College which he had no little part in creating and which he had
served so well. Even then he did not break all his official ties with the
Institution, since he still held his place on the Board. His resignation
was in these words:
To the Trustees of Wake Forest College
Dear Brethren: I hereby resign my place as President of this Board. My growing
infirmities leave no room to doubt touching the necessity of this step. My seat as a
member of the Board I still retain. The most tender emotions are awakened in my
bosom in separating myself from your body. May the richest blessings of Heaven
descend forevermore upon this Institution. S. Wait-Wake Forest College, September
25, 1865.
These further facts about his life may be recorded here. In 1846 he
became pastor of the church at Yanceyville and thereafter for several
years served several pastorages in Caswell, Granville, Person and
Franklin counties; this period he called the happiest of his life. In
1851 he became president of Oxford Female College, a position he
held until the summer of 1857, when he returned to Wake Forest, and
spent the remainder of his life with his only child, Mrs. John M.
Brewer, where he found great joy in her and her children. His last
communication about the College is found in the Biblical Recorder of
June 4, 1862, in which he explains the reason for the suspension, and
expresses the hope that a school of some kind may be still continued
there. In his last years, being afflicted with softening of the brain, he
yet retained his affection
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