506 History of Wake Forest College
1849, reporting that "they in their judgment thought that the plan of
the rostrum in the Commons Hall in the State House in Raleigh would
be the most suitable and would meet the more general appreciation of
the members. And they have therefore employed a workman and have
had the rostrum built after the aforesaid model. And also that they
have employed a painter and had it painted in the neatest style." The
total cost was $133.30 including $13.55 for trimmings.
This rostrum though made after so noble a model for some reason
failed to give satisfaction for very long. On June 3, 1854, the Society
ordered to be taken out and deposited in an empty room, and later
sold it for the sum of two dollars. During the vacation there was built
in its place a much more elegant rostrum, of which the total cost was
$213.60 not including freight and trimmings, nor the cost of desks for
President, Secretary and Supervisor.8
The first rostrum built for the Euzelian Society seems to have been
better than the first built for the sister Society. At any rate they were
satisfied with it the entire period before the Civil War. The only
change was an arch built over it in consequence of a suggestion made
to the Society on March 1, 1853, by Professor W. H. Owen. It is clear
that this rostrum was large enough to accommodate the desk for
President, Secretary and Censor. In care for trimmings and
decorations of the rostrum the Euzelians rivaled and perhaps
surpassed the Philomathesians. Both Societies kept the floors of their
rostrums covered with carpet, and provided with curtains and
trimmings similar in color and material to the curtains of the three
windows in each of the halls. The curtains, hanging from the rails in
front of the three desks and possibly on each side of the platform,
were bordered with fringe, and curtains and other trimmings were of
silk and silk velvet. Enough of these materials could be obtained for
the rostrum for
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8 Phi Records, May 26, 1853, June 3, 1854; November 25, 1854; December 1,
1854.
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