Last Years of Wingate's Administration, 1870-79 133
the students dubbed him with the nickname "Old Aorist," which fell
into disuse when he had given up teaching Latin. Along with the
emphasis on grammar went the teacher's enlightening and stimulating
interpretation of Latin literature. As a master of Latin idiom and as
teacher of the language he had few equals. As long as he lived he
retained his interest in Latin, and in person taught it to his children
and grandchildren. When opportunity offered he would scan with
keen interest the Latin exercise of a college student. Often he would
write short letters to friends in Latin of Ciceronian purity and
elegance.
After his assumption of the presidency of the College in 1884 Dr.
Taylor's chief work in the classroom was in teaching the courses
listed under the heading "School of Moral Philosophy." These courses
he continued to teach, with short intermissions when engaged in
raising funds for the College, as long as he lived, and did his greatest
work as teacher. Some account of him as a teacher of Philosophy will
be given in a later chapter.
The other members of the faculty during the remaining years of the
Wingate administration were Professors W. B. Royall, L. R. Mills,
and W. G. Simmons, of whom some account has already been given.
In June, 1870, John C. Scarborough and C. M. Seawell were
appointed tutors, of whose services recognition has been made above.
Seawell died June 19, 1871, just after he had been elected a regular
member of the faculty, but Scarborough served for the year 1870-71,
being designated in the catalogue as "Instructor in the Preparatory
Department." The next tutor was Mr. Charles H. Martin, appointed in
January, 1872.5 Mr. Martin was orator of the Philomathesian Society
at the Anniversary of 1872. After graduating he studied law at the
University of Virginia and was admitted to the bar of North Carolina;
in August, 1886, he was ordained to the gospel ministry and in 1892
attended the Seminary at Louisville. In 1896 he was elected a
Representative in Congress and served for one term. He was a writer
of verse of which he published "The Maid of
―――――――
5
The General Catalogue is wrong in dating his appointment "Jan. 1882."
Previous Page Next Page