Administration of Thomas Henderson Pritchard 179
THE SCHOOL YEAR OF 1880-81
During this year also, Pritchard was in the field much of the time,
having attended fifteen associational meetings and the Baptist State
Convention, and having made numerous addresses on many other
occasions. His report of this to the Board of Trustees in June, 1881,
reads:
"As to my own labors, I have to report that in carrying out the expressed wishes
of the Trustees at their last session I have spent much time in the field, visiting
associations, lecturing on education and canvassing for students, and money, during
the year. I have visited the following associations: the Beulah, Liberty, Flat River,
Mt. Zion, Eastern, Cape Fear, Brown Creek, Pee Dee, Cedar Creek, Roan Mountain,
Brushy Mountain, Sandy Creek, Central, Raleigh, and Chowan, and also the Baptist
State Convention. I have addressed the following schools: Horner's Academy,
Clayton Academy, Apex High School, Botanical Hill Academy in Nash County,
Yadkin Mineral Springs Academy, Laurinburg High School, and Normal School at
Chapel Hill. I have lectured on education in Bakersville, Marion, Statesville,
Salisbury, Lexington, Concord, Fayetteville, Lumberton, Reidsville, Lockville,
Wilmington and Sanford.
He had also taken much time in trying to combat the recom-
mendation of Governor Jarvis for increased appropriations for the
State University, of which more will be said below. By the close of
the year he had begun to feel that he should devote more time to the
internal affairs of the College, and reported to the Trustees that, while
it would be wise to continue the work in the field, for many reasons
he regarded it as important that the President should remain at the
College long enough to know what was going on, and to have a hand,
at least, in the management of the affairs controlling its interest.
Again, however, it could be said that the College had had the most
prosperous year in its history, and was in better financial condition
that at any time since the Civil War; the total invested funds
amounted to $48,113.88. The number of students had reached 181,
not the coveted 200, but more than ever before. This
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