Reopening and Reorganization 21
until the beginning of the year 1872-73. Tuition in the preparatory
department was $30 a term until the close of the year 1868-69; after
that time no distinction was made in the statement of tuition fees, and
it was the same for all. The tuition fees in the collegiate department
beginning with the catalogue of 1866-67 and extending through that
of 1875-76 were $35 a term; beginning with the catalogue of 1876-77
and extending through the catalogue of 1901-02, tuition fees are $30 a
term. Beginning with the catalogue of 1902-03 the tuition fees for
several years were $25 a term, with a matriculation fee of $10 a term
"required of all students." Of the fees for the later years more will be
said when that portion of the history is reached.
From 1866 until the close of the century the dormitory rooms in the
College Building were rented for $6 a term, one-half to be paid by
each of the two occupants. The same amount was to be paid for
servant's hire. Already in the catalogue of 1866-67 the price of table
board is fixed at $2.50 to $3 a week, and a few years later there is a
further reduction, it being stated that board in clubs may be had as
low as $7 a month-and these were prices that were not exceeded
before the year 1914; in fact, in the decade 1890-1900 good club
board might often be had for $5 a month. During all this period good
rooms in private families might he had for two to three dollars a
month.
It was to fees mainly that the College had to look for revenue, since
the endowment was yielding at best for the next ten years not more
than a thousand dollars a year. In the spring term of 1866 it would
seem that the fees from the sixty-seven students yielded enough to
give a living to the three members of faculty, but only a meager
living. Three or more of the students were ministers and paid no
tuition, and others were paying their tuition with coupons from
scholarships, but probably as much as $1,200 was collected in fees of
all kinds. How unsatisfactory was the compensation coming in this
way to the faculty may be inferred from the fact that in October, 1866,
Dr. Wingate seems to have been induced to resume his duties as
president only on the "promise of a
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