The Board of Education, 1862-1915 457
the harvest and how few are the laborers, I stand appalled at the
stupendous magnitude of the sin we shall commit in not qualifying
these Young men to go forth as ambassadors of Christ.
Many only less fervent appeals were made by others for the same
object, but by no one was the need of a greater number of educated
ministers more clearly seen than by Dr. W. T. Walters, Secretary of
the Convention. At his own expense he supported one beneficiary at
Wake Forest College and his interest was shared by some members of
the faculty and others at Wake Forest, so that Dr. Pritchard declared
that "the church at Wake Forest is the most liberal in the State, not
only in regard to this, but in respect to all our benevolent
enterprises.5
The Beulah Association, always a strong supporter of the College,
had its own beneficiary, H. A. Brown. The Charlotte Church made a
contribution of thirty dollars for Columbus Durham of that
Association. There were many large individual contributors. A lady of
Hillsboro gave a handkerchief and gold pin. The ladies of the
Wilmington church sent a box of valuable clothing; on several
occasions churches sent flour, hams and cheeses, and other foodstuffs.
The amount of cash contributed, however, remained distressingly
small.6
Doubtless much was done privately that was not reported to
the Board of Education. For instance the Euzelian Society, for a
period of four years, beginning with February, 1867, contributed
regularly to the support of G. W. Greene, taking care of his wardrobe
as well as of his other expenses.
7
AGENTS
From the first the Board realized that it would need an agent to
secure funds for its functioning. In their meeting of November
―――――――
5
Biblical Recorder, October 21, 1868.
6 "The mass meeting on Education gave us some good speeches, some good
pledges, and a little (but very little) money. Let it be remembered that neither
pledges nor `much speaking' can feed hungry students. For them a ham of meat is
much better than a fine oration; a dish of cabbage is better than a Dutch joke."
Biblical Recorder, November 11, 1868, editorial report of meeting of Convention.
7
Minutes of Eu. Soc. for these years. W. H. Pace took a leading part in caring for
the wants of Greene.
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