40 History of Wake Forest College
in recent years that unbeautiful straight walks and those with inartistic
curves and interrupting circles have been substituted. Many efforts
have been made by citizens of the town, sometimes aided by certain
members of the faculty, to get the road back to the center of the
Campus, the last in 1924 during the building of the paved highway, a
part of U S No. 1, but the Trustees were adamant. Finally an end was
put to these attacks on the unity of the Campus, when in 1931 under
President Kitchin's direction the Johnson Building was constructed
facing North Main Street.
It was in the spring of 1938 that the present brick walks, begun a
year or two earlier, were completed, and the side of the Campus next
the railroad given its present contour. It was thought desirable to have
the main walk lead to the underpass of the railroad, which was
constucted two years earlier and made a deep cut necessary near the
station, where the main path to town had formerly crossed.
The next part of President Taylor's plan was the setting of trees,
shrubs and flowering plants. The first planting was December 13-16,
1885, when 300 trees-100 magnolias, 100 maples, 100 evergreens-
were set. In the next April, 1,000 vines and shrubs, including 500
roses, were planted, and grass seed were sown on the open spaces,
which had been prepared by cultivation in corn and cotton to kill the
sedge and
weeds.16
The hundred magnolias were donated by as many
friends of the College, and a record was made of each individual gift
and of the location of the tree, which was sometimes marked with a
small stone. Later other magnolias were added, the total number in
1906 being 176. They are now tall and magnificent trees, flowering
every year beginning the latter half of May. Other trees were also
planted from time to time; in the list made by Dr. W. L. Poteat and
appended to Dr. Gorrell's article are the names of fifty-five varieties
of trees, exclusive of shrubs and bushes, 796 specimens,
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16
Dr. J. H. Gorrell, loco citato. Dr. Gorrell quotes "Doctor" Tom Jeffreys, the
college servant, as saying: "Me and Doctor Taylor sot out all de bushes and
scrubbery in de campus under the instructions of de Doctor."
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