68 History of Wake Forest College
Wake Forest, Trinity, and Davidson, they should insist in these two
large denominations having a fair representation in the Board of
Trustes and the Faculty of the State School, and the justness of their
claim was conceded by all."
After this meeting the friends of the University took new heart, and
among them the friends of Wake Forest were as active as any in
preparing the way for its reopening. Early in 1874 Dr. Pritchard, then
a trustee of Wake Forest College and four years later president, came
forward with a strong article in favor of the opening and proposing
former Governor Z. B. Vance for president. He stated his argument in
these words
By all means, let the University be revived; it is vital to the best interest of the
State. It won't hurt Wake Forest or Davidson or
Trinity. On the contrary, it will help them in every way. When Chapel Hill had
450 students, Wake Forest had as many as now. There are over three hundred now
at college from North Carolina in other States. It is a reproach to us that Alabama
should have rebuilt her University and put it in succesful operation, and ours cannot
be revived though we have such magnificent buildings .12
After this, though little was said, the Alumni and friends of the
University were at work and there was no doubt of the success of their
efforts to revive
it.13
By January 1, 1875, as a result of a constitutional
amendment which was sustained by the Supreme Court of the State,
the way was once more open for the University Trustees to take
measures for its opening. At this time the friends of Wake Forest
College again were freely expressing their opinion as to the kind of a
school they would like the University to be. They were not willing
that the Baptists should not have a share in its reorganization and
control, but they had become more than ever convinced that the
University should not be merely a college supported by the State as a
rival of the denominational colleges, but in reality a great State
University, offering the young men of North Carolina training in all
branches of learning. "Make it a great University," said one, "worthy
of the name and honor of
―――――――
12 Biblical Recorder, February 18, 1874.
13
For the various steps see Battle, History of the University of North Carolina,
Volume II, Chapter 1.
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