92 History of Wake Forest College
At the opening on September 24, 1918, there were more first year
men than ever before, a full hundred more than the number to be
expected in a normal year. There was no compulsion but nearly all
except ministerial students came to enlist as soldiers in the S.A.T.C.
unit. A few upper classmen also came for the training. As soldiers in
the Army they had certain advantages. The United States government
provided them the cost of board and lodging and tuition fees, and a
uniform and thirty dollars a month as pay.5 Of the 383 enrolled in the
fall term 235 were enlisted in the S.A.T.C. The work of these was
definitely prescribed by the War Department, ten hours a week of
academic work in the College, and the military training; four of these
hours might be freely elected in accord with the regulations of the
College; the remaining six hours were definitely prescribed by the
War Department, but the College furnished all instructors. One of the
prescribed courses was War Aims, which was taken by 225 students.
Other courses meeting the prescription and largely taken by the first-
year men were English, French, chemistry, mathematics and
surveying. With the exception of the first year men, the largest unit of
S.A.T.C. was in the School of Medicine, which in that year had 34
students registered.
The members of the faculty easily fell in with the new order. To
teach the increased number of sections in English composition Dr. G.
W. Paschal of the Greek and Latin departments and Professor R. B.
White of the School of Law, were called to the aid of Dr. Sledd, the
former with two sections of Freshman English, the latter with one.
These and the other teachers of S.A.T.C. men found some of them
well prepared, others poorly prepared, some bright and others dull,
but there was nothing unusual in that; they had such students before.
These men offered no new problem in getting work done. Most of
them were willing to learn and all soon were putting a "Sir" in their
answers to questions. All went as well with these as with freshmen of
other years, but after seven weeks, just as the profesors were making
their
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5
President W. L. Poteat in the Biblical Recorder, August 21, September 4, 18,
October 2, November 13,
1918.
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