192 History of Wake Forest College
The College had only this one building for the next decade. But as
we have seen
above,2
as early as August, 1872, Dr. T. H. Pritchard
was urging the need of more buildings, which he said should be
"elegant and tasteful structures, and not rude and unsightly barn-like
buildings." And he went on to argue that "handsome buildings and
beautiful grounds exert a good moral as well as esthetic influence, and
have much to do with pleasing students and retaining them at
College." 3 And it is to Dr. Pritchard that the College owes the interest
that led to the construction of the first additional buildings erected
after the Civil War.
The first of these buildings was what is now known as the Heck-
Williams Building, without the western wing which was added many
years later; the second was Wingate Memorial Building, which was
burned in February, 1934. Both were to be located on a line with the
old College Building, Science Hall (the Heck-Williams building)
about 70 feet to the north and the Memorial building the same
distance to the south. It was Dr. Pritchard's conception that these two
buildings should be connected with the central College Building by
two-story colonnades, 20 feet wide, the whole presenting a front of
460 feet, to be one of the most imposing structures in the
State.4
The first to be erected was the Heck-Williams Building, and as
originally planned it was designed primarily for a science building,
while the second story was to be turned over to the Literary Societies
for their halls and libraries. It was the gift of two generous men of
Raleigh, Mr. John G. Williams and Colonel J. M. Heck. Dr. Pritchard
was their spokesman in announcing their purpose, when
mature.5
There is a tradition that Mr.
―――――
2 Chapter on "The Endowment, 1870-73."
3
Biblical Recorder, August 21 and 28, 1872.
4 Biblical Recorder, May 15, 1878, quoting from article by Dr. T. H. Pritchard in
Raleigh Observer, Biblical Recorder, June 19, 1878.
5 "Our fellow citizens, Col. J. M. Heck and Mr. John G. Williams, have
generously agreed to erect a new and handsome structure to be known as Science
Hall-the first story of which structure is to be a Hall of Science, and the second to be
appropriated to two halls for the Literary Societies." Dr. Pritchard in Raleigh News
quoted in Biblical Recorder, May 15, 1878.
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