Buildings and Grounds 211
Poteat. This committee chose as architect Mr. Frank E. Perkins of
New York City, whose delay in furnishing the plans delayed its
construction, and frustrated the hopes of the committee to have the
dormitory open for occupation at the beginning of the session in
September,
1913.38
Failing to secure a satisfactory contractor, the
committee appointed as superintendent of construction Mr. W. L.
McMichael, who was at Wake Forest at the time superintending the
construction of the Wake Forest Baptist Church. The general direction
was entrusted to a committee consisting of E. B. Earnshaw, J. H.
Gorrell, G. W. Paschal, and W. L. Poteat. Work was begun on August
26, 1913, and the first brick laid on September 6. It was complete and
ready for occupation on September 7, 1914. It contains four sections
each with three full stories and an attic. Each section is entered by a
door of its own and with its own staircases and communicating with
the other sections only in the attic. The building committee consisted
of C. E. Taylor, W. S. Rankin, L. M. Gaines, C. E. Brewer, W. L.
Poteat, J. B. Carlyle. The total accommodations are for seventy-five.
In the basement was put the first heating plant of the College, which
provided steam heat for the dormitory itself, Wingate Memorial Hall,
the old College Building and the Library, until the present heating
plant was constructed in the summer of 1924. In the basement also
were the offices of the superintendent of grounds, and, since the
removal of the heating plant, workshops. According to the architect's
plan the present construction was only part of a dormitory
surrounding a quadrangle, the opposite sides parallel but separated at
the corners by wedge-shaped units which on the lower floor contained
each a parlor and a guest room. But as the plan was never carried out
the present structure has an inartistic and incomplete appearance.
Since the building is on a plan that is no longer followed or
sanctioned by the laws of North Carolina and is not fireproof, no
addition to it will probably ever be made. The total cost, provided for
mostly by a reserve which had been carefully built
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38 Bulletin of Wake Forest College, New Series, VII, 202, VIII, 166.
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