The School of Law 321
LIBRARY
In its early years the School of Law was very poorly equipped with
books. There were indeed in the general Library many law books-
nearly all the codes of law from the "Yellow Jacket" of 1751-52, and
for most years after 1860 volumes of the laws passed by the General
Assembly of the State. But the collection of books set apart for the
law library was small, and was housed behind a partition separating it
from the lecture room. The first official reference to it is in the
catalogue of 1896-97. In that year Associate Justice Walter Clark and
Chief Justice W. T. Faircloth of the State Supreme Court had made
valuable gifts, the former thirty-one volumes, the latter two hundred
and eighty-five volumes, to which he added after three years a
valuable law encyclopedia of eighteen volumes; and after his death,
by bequest a much larger number. In addition during this year several
publishing houses gave valuable books. The first recorded
expenditure by the College for the library was for the year 1899-1900.
The amount was $39.00; after that there were annual expenditures for
law books, which for the decade ending in May, 1909, amounted to
$429.55, an average of $42.96 a year. For the next decade, 1909-10 to
1918-19, the expenditure was $872.85, an average of $87.29 a year.
The average for the twenty years was $65.12 a year. The smallest
amount was $8.50 for 1907-08; the largest, $321.87 for
1912-13.18
The law library was the regular recipient of certain court reports,
especially those of the Supreme Court of North Carolina and the
Supreme Court of the United States. The library was easily accessible
through a door opening from the classroom, where students were free
to use them at all times, and especially in the afternoon. As the doors
were never closed there were constant losses, which rendered the
library much less valuable than it might have been. Sporadically in
the early years, and regularly
―――――――
18 For the gifts see the Wake Forest Student for November and December, 1896;
for the expenditures see the summaries of the bursar's reports made to the Trustees.
Previous Page Next Page