24 History of Wake Forest College
commented upon in the educational press. One other feature of the
new plan, one which was foreseen at the time, was that the definite
statement of the work of the first two years made it clear what work
the junior colleges from which the college receives students should
undertake to do, that they should make their students proficient in the
work of the Freshman and Sophomore years, and leave the work of
the Junior and Senior years to be done in the College.
This scheme of studies continued without essential change to
appear in all catalogues until that of 1929-30, the last year of
President Gaines' administration, in which it is superseded by a
system of major and minor studies made up for each student under the
guidance of the head of the department in which the student does his
major work. Even before this, as early as the catalogue of 1922-23,
reference is made to major and minor studies which as worked out
later provide for further specification in the group
scheme.5
The chief modifications in the curriculum of the College during the
period of Poteat's administration were caused by changes in the
course of study of the public high schools of the State. These high
school modifications concerned chiefly the foreign languages. Even
before the day of the public high school only a few schools were able
to teach elementary Greek; accordingly, from the beginning Wake
Forest College and most other colleges have offered courses in
elementary Greek, for which for many years they gave no credit on
degrees. Nearly all high schools and academies, however, undertook
to prepare students for college classes in Latin, and practically all
high school students who were contemplating a college course took
Latin. The high schools often complained to the colleges for taking
students with less than four years of Latin; it was the high schools,
they said, and not the colleges that should offer courses in Caesar,
Cicero's
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5 Duke University along with the system of majors and minors still retains nine
"groups" in which are suggested those courses that best fit students for various lines
of work. Some think they might have been retained with profit at Wake Forest
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