336 History of Wake Forest College
of North Carolina Medical College and had received the degree of
Doctor of Medicine from the University of Maryland in 1901, and for
a year had done post-graduate work in Johns Hopkins University. He
was young and enthusiastic. He had already won reputation in his
practice at Morehead City by his investigation of the newly
discovered hook-worm. With this equipment of faculty members the
School of Medicine was prepared to do the first two years of work for
the degree of Doctor of Medicine. It was examined by officers of the
American Medical Association and at the meeting of that body in
Atlantic City, May, 1904, was admitted to its membership, a position
which it still maintains. The first students of the Wake Forest School
of Medicine, graduating that year, and holding its certificates of
proficiency were freely admitted to the four-year medical colleges to
complete their course, and so they have been until the present, since
the Wake Forest School of Medicine has improved its curriculum to
keep pace with the suggestions of the American Medical Association,
and the students trained in it have almost uniformly made good
records in the four-year schools. A more detailed statement of this
matter will be given below.
No further changes were made in the faculty of the School during
President Taylor's administration.
In its first year the School of Medicine was cramped for lack of
proper laboratories and a dissecting room. For the latter the west half
of the basement of the Gymnasium was used for the first three years,
but thereafter the School found ample quarters on the second and third
floors of the Alumni Building, until the erection of the William Amos
Johnson Medical Building in 1932-33 provided for it most
adequately.6
In May, 1905, Dr. Cooke resigned as professor and dean of the
School of Medicine. As the character of the School was already
indicated, it is convenient here to give some statements
―――――――
6 In the early years, the cadavers were sometimes treated with indignity and hung
on the trees of the Campus by students who wanted a dirty job. It was observed, too,
that the walks leading by the Gymnasium were not much used by colored family
servants at night, who preferred the longer and less gruesome streets around the
Campus.
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