The School of Medicine 361
Medicine have been made to conform to the regulations of the
Association of American Medical Colleges. It is to be further noted
that the Board of Trustees always has sought to keep the regulations
as to the practice of Medicine and Surgery by members of the medical
faculty in conformity with the regulations of the
Association.11
As has been told above, the office of dean of the School of
Medicine was discontinued in May, 1911. The hope seems to have
been that putting all the professors on an equality would make for
peace and harmony among them. It was further argued that since the
College was small and the School of Medicine likewise small
President Poteat could exercise a general oversight over both. But
results did not justify these hopes. We have seen that the dissensions
continued, although from 1914 to 1917 the members of the faculty
were at peace among themselves. But apart from dissensions, it soon
became evident that the School needed a dean. Every member of the
medical faculty was doing that which was right in his own eyes; each
made his own report to the Trustees and in every report magnified his
own department. The committee of the Trustees had to take all these
reports and do the best it could with them. It was not long before the
Board learned that it would have been much simpler to have one
report from a dean with recommendations for giving each department
its due. And there was this further evil: there was no one who had the
authority to speak for the School and be its representative at meetings,
such as those of the American Medical Association. It was also
evident that the School was needing a head who could plan for its
future and progress. In the spring of 1919 Dr. W. S. Rankin began to
take an active interest in the matter, and it was at his suggestion that
the Board of Trustees at their meeting in June, 1919 reestablished the
office of dean of the School, and it was at his suggestion, also, that the
dean was Dr. T. D. Kitchin. Results have shown the wisdom of this
step. At times the dean has been able to adjust differences that
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11
See minutes of Board of Trustees for June 15, 1919.
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