Faculty and Curriculum Under Kitchin 413
leges of the State by the condition of language study in the public
high schools, is its ruinous effect on the departments of Latin in Wake
Forest and other colleges. Finding no opportunity to take up the study
of Latin in nearly all the high schools, the student comes up to college
with no other training in a foreign language than the two years in
French, usually under an inefficient teacher; he has passed the age
when the study of a language is most profitably begun, and if he is
one of the very few of his kind who are bold enough to begin the
study of Latin in college, he is handicapped and usually discontinues
it after a year or two. Thus he is denied that wide knowledge of the
Latin language and literature which is all but indispensable in the
equipment of the scholar who can interpret for himself the literature
of the ages relating to religion, theology, church history and ancient
and medieval European history. To be more specific, under the
present provisions for language study in North Carolina high schools
and in Wake Forest College, it has become most difficult and almost
impossible to develop learned ministers of the gospel and other
authoritative scholars on matters of religion such as the Baptists of
our State so imperatively need and will continue to need in increasing
numbers. The practical withdrawal of the high schools of the State
from instruction in Latin means that the only persons equipped to
speak authoritatively on the development of Christianity will soon be
those trained in Roman Catholic parochial schools and colleges and
seminaries.
In its effects on the Greek department of the College the lowering
of the language requirements has not been so deleterious. Only a few
high schools of the State have ever taught Greek, and the student has
usually done his first year of Greek in the colleges. The difference
now is that the average student beginning Greek has not had previous
training in Latin which is so valuable for other language study.
Sometimes, owing to the current hostility to language study, a student
would enter the class in beginner's Greek who had. never looked into
an English grammar and had never heard of parts of speech. At Wake
Forest the best has been made of a bad situation. It has been
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