40 History of Wake Forest College
periodicals as the Dial. In his teachings his requirements of members
of his classes were severe, and he did not have a popular turn. "He
made them come across," was the statement of one of his students,
now known for his journalistic ability and as a writer of many
volumes, who like all Dr. Morton's abler students and members of the
faculty of the College greatly respected and admired him. Dr. Morton
remained only one year, when, after teaching in the summer school of
Cornell University, he engaged in editorial work in Chicago, where he
died in April, 1914.
Immediately succeeding Dr. Morton was Mr. J. B. Hubbell, with
the rank of associate professor; his courses in the department were
those of the first year, and an advanced course in rhetoric and speech-
writing. He remained at the College for three years, until June, 1914,
when he was granted a year's leave of absence for further study in
Columbia University. He is now Professor of English in Duke
University.
In the same year, 1914-15, Professor Sledd also was granted a leave
of absence, with full salary, that he might enjoy the traveling
Fellowship of the Kahn Foundation, with a stipend of about $3,000 a
year. His plan was to visit all the countries of Europe and Asia, and
return by way of England the following summer. But he had been in
Europe hardly a month when his plans were interrupted by the
outbreak of the World War, and he saw only Britain and the countries
of Ireland, Scotland, England, France, Switzerland, Italy, Corfu,
Sicily, Greece. According to President Poteat,2 faculty and students
regarded the appointment as a great honor to the College.
For the year 1914-15, during the absence of both Professors Sledd
and Hubbell, the College was fortunate in securing Mr. Roger P.
McCutcheon, a graduate of the College in the class of 1910, as acting
professor with the rank of associate. He had taught a year at the
University of Minnesota, and was a scholarly and able teacher,
familiar with conditions at Wake Forest. During the year 1914-15 he
did practically all the work of the department, but after the return of
Professor Sledd, for the year
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2
Bulletin of Wake Forest College, for July, 1914, p. 156, and July 15, p. 142.
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