58 History of Wake Forest College
of other officers. The chief interest, however, of these reports was the
students and their problems, especially discipline, and doubtless this
has been the part of the duties of the office that has caused the deans
the. greatest amount of trouble. During the, years of the administration
of Dr. Poteat the deans with the assistance at times of a committee of
the faculty investigated all serious delinquencies of students and
reported them to the faculty for judgment. When Dr. Brewer assumed
the duties of the office the Honor Committee and the Student Senate
were already in existence; the latter having been formed in
September, 1908, had to do especially with cases of hazing, while the
Honor Committee was concerned with cheating on examinations.
Nearly all the deans speak in their reports appreciatively of the assist-
ance rendered by these committees in maintaining discipline, and Dr.
Sikes was convinced that they were building up a healthy sentiment
against these evils that would result in their entire elimination. But
these evils have continued to trouble the deans and the faculty, and
doubtless will continue to trouble them.8 In 1921-22, under the
guidance of Dean Timberlake a new and elaborate system of student
government was introduced which is still functioning although there
has been a discontinuation of certain regulations restricting the
freedom and prescribing distinctive head-dress of Freshmen. In
general the deans report that it has functioned well, but in 1926 Dean
Bryan notes that toward the end of the year 1925-26 its executive
council had "suffered from internal dissensions which resulted in a
lapse of discipline." In one of its provisions, however, it proved very
unsatisfactory to those chiefly concerned, the freshmen. They
accepted under duress and tolerated the prescribed "freshman
―――――――
8
Already, in May, 1913, Mr. Romulus Skaggs, editor of the Wake Forest
Student, supposed that hazing and: cheating on examinations were no more. "The
student body," says he, "takes care of its own behavior through its own Senate and
Honor Committee without interference from the faculty. A student can no longer
cheat on examination and with impunity go on his way rejoicing. ‘Ye verdant
Freshie’ of four years ago is ‘my first year friend' of today. While the abolition of
hazing has, left an aching void which ought to be filled by substituting certain rules
governing the behavior and attire of the Freshman so as to make his imagined
commensurate with his real importance," etc.
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