80 History of Wake Forest College
tan interest that he had acquired during his long service as director of
Southern Baptist missionary enterprises in continental Europe and the
Near East, while he and his wife with their Sunday afternoon
receptions added much that was wholesome and stimulating to the
social life of the students and others.
The present pastor, Rev. E. I. Olive, had served the Baptist Church
at Chapel Hill and at North Wilkesboro as his last pastorates before
coming to Wake Forest. An alumnus of the College in the class of
1910, he has entered on his pastorate with interest in his work and a
knowledge of its problems, and is proving an acceptable pastor.
The pastors' salaries during this period beginning with the coming
of Dr. Johnson in August, 1909, were: W. N. Johnson, $1,000 from
church and stipend from College; C. D. Graves, $1,500 from Church
and stipend from College; Paul Bagby, $4,200, J. A. Easley, $4,200
until the depression years, when the salary was reduced to $3,500,
which now, 1943, has been increased to $4,200. Of this the College
has paid $900. Beginning with Bagby's coming the Church has
provided a pastor's home.
During most of the years of President Poteat's administration, the
evangelistic impulse was strong in the Church and the College.
Special revival services were provided annually, and often there were
many professions of faith among the students and many added to the
Church by baptism.4 Among the visiting preachers at the revival
seasons have been J. L. White, November, 1908;
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4
The total number of baptisms into the membership of the Church during the
twenty-one years of President Poteat's administration beginning with the
associational year ending October, 1906, and closing with that of October, 1926,
was 310. By years these were: 1906, 11; 1907, 7; 1908, 7; 1909, 29; 1910, 11; 1911,
1; 1912, 16; 1913, 3; 1914, 35; 1915, 9; 1916, 7; 1917, 31; 1918, 2; 1919, 13; 1920,
16; 1921, 21; 1922, 11; 1923, 28; 1924, 15; 1925, 28; 1926, 9. During the three
years of President Gaines' administration the number of baptisms was 55, as
follows: 1927, 20; 1928, 5; 1929, 5; 1930, 25. During the years of President
Kitchin's administration the number is 129, as follows: 1931, 9; 1932, 7; 1933, 28;
1934, 11; 1935, 6; 1936, 5; 1937, 20; 1938, 15; 1939, 5; 1940, 11; 1941, 2; 1942,
10. In 1906 the number of members were reported as 241; in 1927, 446; In 1940,
646; in 1942, 641. The per cent of increase of baptized members to the total
membership has seriously fallen off in recent years, the decrease doubtless being
due to the decreasing number of students of the College coming up for baptism.
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