202 THE HISTORY OF WAKE FOREST COLLEGE
Poteat died less than two years later, on January 29, 1958, at seventy-
one.
Members of the classical languages faculty for the years under
study include the following: Hubert M. Poteat, 1912-56; Cronje B.
Earp, 1940-; Ray L. Greene, 1948-51; Francis Lanneau Newton,
1950-51; Carl V Harris, 1956- ; John E. Roberts, 1962-64; Barney L.
Rickenbacker, Jr., 1964-66; James A. Wilson, 1964-67; Nancy
Hollingsworth Brown, 1965-66; C. Wayne Tucker, 1966-; and Sally
Rackley, 1966-67.
Education5
As World War II began, Dean D. B. Bryan was chairman of the
Department of Education and Prof. Jasper L. Memory was the second
staff member. The deanship took more of Dr. Bryan's time as the
college grew, and Professor Memory assumed more of the de-
partmental duties. He was also variously director of the summer
school, director of placement, and alumni director, and until 1947 he
continued editing the Alumni News, a job he had taken on in 1934.
Memory was vastly suited for the alumni responsibilities, because he
had a wide acquaintance among Wake Forest graduates and rarely
forgot a name or a face. He delighted in telling his stories, and his
store of them seemed inexhaustible. Few members of the college
family have served Wake Forest as well or in as many different
capacities.
Eighteen semester hours, consisting of professional courses along
with practice teaching, were required for an education major. The
subject requirements were determined by each department and the
State Department of Public Instruction, by whom graduates were
certified.
The post-World War II period brought heavy enrollment to the
Education Department, and like the rest of the college it was
swamped with students. In 1946-47 Bryan and Memory taught 217 in
their classes. In 1947-48 the number jumped to 311, and Dean Bryan
employed Carl H. Weatherly, who had been a Leaksville high school
principal, as a third man to aid the department the following year.
In 1948-49 there were 336 students, in 1949-50 there were 531, and
the total climbed to 603 in 1950-51. The year 1952-53, when 503
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