84 THE HISTORY OF WAKE FOREST COLLEGE
Prof. Dalma A. Brown, English: "Believing that Wake Forest can best
serve by stressing liberal arts education, I naturally do not recommend
further expansion into the field of purely professional training. Furthermore,
I think that we should re-examine our present undergraduate program in the
light of the ideals of a liberal education."
Dr. John W. Chandler, philosophy and psychology: "The job of a college
is to educate the whole man, not to train technologists…. Our system of
professional schools must remain clearly peripheral to the hard core of
the liberal arts curriculum. There must be no circumventing of the basic
curriculum to facilitate premature professional specialization."
Dr. J. A. Easley, religion: "… A strong undergraduate college seems
clearly implied. The basic strength of the present institution is in its under-
graduate school…. It seems necessary that this phase of our college be
recognized as absolutely essential and that no expansion be allowed to
weaken it."
Dr. E. E. Folk, English: "Twenty-five hundred years ago that ultramodern
philosopher, Plato, said that the purpose of education is to develop in the
body and in the soul all the beauty and all the perfection of which they are
capable. This statement puts the emphasis on culture and quality and thus
decries the trade-school tendencies which have eaten worm holes in liberal
education on the college level…. I am not belittling scholarship; I am
insisting on perfection of learning directed to become a part of the student-
of his body and intellect and soul-to enable him to live a richer and more
profitable life than he can learn in technical schools."
Dr. Robert M. Helm, Jr., philosophy and psychology: "Wake Forest must
emphasize quality rather than numbers."
Dr. Owen F. Herring, religion: "It is not essential, perhaps not desirable,
that Wake Forest be a large university…. A good college is preferable to a
poor university"
Lois Johnson, dean of women: "… We have a chance to make it
[Wake Forest College] a really distinguished college which puts emphasis
on the humanities…. Fine training in the humanities is needed to offset the
danger of developing a culture that tends toward materialism and he-
donism."
Dr. H. Broadus Jones, English: "I do not believe that we should repeat
Francis Bacon's blitzkrieg, taking all learning for our province. The college
of liberal arts should be central and supreme."
Dr. John W. Nowell, chemistry: "Academically, I believe that very good
small colleges are more desperately needed at the present time than are
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