on the way to the sesquicentennial
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255
at University gatherings, and they invariably presented themselves
with warmth and good cheer.1 Now, in 1980, Joyner was knowing
and experienced and was prepared to be a central architect for the
next phase of the sesquicentennial campaign.
That campaign, beginning in 1980 and ending, it was confidently
expected, in 1984, would seek $17.5 million: $4,000,000 in College
endowment, $3,000,000 for faculty development, $2,000,000 in
endowment for financial aid for students, $2,000,000 in law school
endowment, $2,000,000 in Babcock School endowment, $4,000,000
for the music wing of the Scales Fine Arts Center, and $450,000 for
miscellaneous student life and curriculum needs.
Wake Forest’s principal benefactor, the Z. Smith Reynolds Foun-
dation, was prepared to sign a new contract with the University—
the signing actually took place on January 14, 1981—which would
guarantee the University $620,000 a year in perpetuity for operation
1
During the years of
the Scales presidency
Straughan and
Joyner were ably
assisted by a series
of men and women,
most of them alum-
ni, who worked in
various assignments
in development,
alumni affairs, and
creative services.
Their names are
listed, usually to
indicate when they
were appointed or
whether they subse-
quently resigned, in
the “Administrative
Notes” at the end of
the various chapters
University Relations staff. In front: Bob Mills and Craig Jackson. Standing: Jane Carmichael, Julius
Corpening, Claudia Stitt, Bill Joyner, Minta McNally, and Bob Baker.
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