appendices
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5. at last the institute opens
Monday, Feb. 3rd, 1834. “The weather was remarkably
fine. As delightful as a day in May.” The life and work of
the Institute: rules, regulations, and fees. A student writes
home. A ducking in the creek! “Moonlight and music.
There’s no place like Wake Forest.”
6. saturday music 1835
Parents are re-assured. A midnight party with Dick the
Fiddler. A lament for female company.
7. early celebrations
July 4th, 1835—A countless multitude of belles and beaux,
and more, come to Wake Forest on July 4.” Mrs. Wait
presents banners to the Literary Societies.
8. the institute becomes a college
In 1838, manual labor ceases. “The Institute is forthwith to
be known as The Wake Forest College.” Days of peace and
prosperity.
9. war! the college closes
Nov. 1860, Abraham Lincoln is elected President. April
12th, 1861, guns are fired at Charleston. May 5th, 1862,
Wake Forest closes. “The new conscription laws took all the
students except five.” A Wake Forest soldier gets a letter
from home. “Sixty-seven Wake Forest men lost their lives
in the War between the States.”
10. the aftermath of war
Dr. Wingate tries to re-open the College against much
opposition. A decision is made. The College re-opens on
Friday, January 12th, 1866. “A torch of truth has been
lighted in this wild forest and by God’s Grace it will never go
out.” The College begins to thrive again.
11. the magnolias of wake forest & dr. tom Jeffries
“Wake Forest College where the magnolias bloom.” A
tribute to Tom Jeffries, janitor of the College for 43 years.
12. an early tradition—greeting the shoo-fly!
13. dr. william louis poteat—
one of the many great presidents
“Billy with the red necktie.” The first layman president is
appointed in 1905. “He was always unexpected, always
surprising and usually troubling.… and we loved him for
it.” The Evolution controversy. “Poteat must resign!”
14. disaster on the old campus
May 5th, 1933, the fires begin! Dr. Thurman Kitchen
launches a $7 million expansion and re-building campaign,
despite the years of Depression.
15. world war ii
Wake Forest is again in danger of closing. Woman admitted
as students. “They decided to take women for the duration
of the war, but we were here to stay!”
16. wake forest school of medical sciences
moves to winston-salem
In 1946 there are offers of an endowment and a site if the
College moves to Winston-Salem. “Many of us did not want
the College to move.”
17. the groundbreaking for the new campus
Monday, Oct. 15th, 1951, President Truman breaks the
ground and the building begins. “The first visit of a presi-
dent of the United States to Winston-Salem since George
Washington came here in 1791.”
18. farewells to the old campus
Edwin Wilson takes a last look at the Alumni building.
19. winston-salem welcomes wake forest college
A reception is held in the Coliseum with 6,000 people
present! A welcome from the Mayor. The first building and
the heart of the College—Wait Chapel! “The buildings are
of modified Georgian architecture and constructed of old
Virginia brick trimmed with granite and limestone. The
campus is one of the most attractive in the South.”
20. a hundred years of athletics—
a tribute to the deacons!
21. the first black student comes to wake forest
Edward Reynolds, From Ghana.
22. the sixties and the seventies
The College becomes a University. James Ralph Scales is
appointed president. Expansion. A welcome to Casa Artom in
Venice and to the Worrell House in London. “Sorry it’s rain-
ing!” The Scales Fine Arts Center is completed—a first recital.
23. a new president a look to the future
1983, Dr. Scales retires and Thomas K. Hearn becomes the
new President. “It is into the hands of each new student
generation that Wake Forest commits its future.”
epilogue: The night before Graduation, 1984. Some voices from
the past. A prayer for the future. A celebration of 150 years!
“May Wake Forest continue forever to be a place where
reason, imagination and faith flourish—a place eternally
and fearlessly in pursuit of the truth. A place which is open,
hospitable, generous, loving and free.”
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