acceptable for mom to intervene and make it all ok. Yet I
needed to acknowledge the hurt she was experiencing. I took
a deep breath, shot up a prayer, and then did the best I could.
My girl’s body language and unwillingness to engage in
conversation around what was happening communicated to
me that I as mom was going to have to tolerate and deal with
my own feelings. She would figure this out.
Grace entered the scene on this day as two beloved
teachers came across our path. Maybe they saw the panic in my
eyes or maybe the hurt and confusion in the eyes of my
daughter. They excitedly invited her to run with them and off
they went together. I decompressed, felt my heart rise up,
thanked God for teachers, and waited peacefully and
expectantly for her to run across the finish line. She ran fast
and hard, spurred on by these two people she loves, and
crossed the finish line well ahead of most of her peers,
including two that had hurt her feelings. Ok, now I’m being
snarky.
There is still so much for each of us to learn as both
daughter and mom. At the end of this run, a dear friend and
mom of a grown daughter reminded me of how resourceful
my girls are and that these things will happen along the way.
My heart would like to shield them from all meanness as
instigator or recipient, but my mind knows that is neither
possible nor healthy. These are times that invite each of us to
learn and grow. I know that on any given day, my girls, just like
their mom, can land on either side of the mean girl equation.
ADOPTING GRACE ADVANCED READING COPY
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