I N S I D E T H I S
I S S U E : :
Faculty and Student
Panel Discussion:
Online Summer College
Courses
3
Office of the Provost
grant announcement
5
WFU School of
Business recognized for
innovation
7
Provost’s Newsletter
F E B R U A R Y 4 , 2 0 1 6 V O L U M E 4 , I S S U E 3
S P E C I A L D A T E S O F
I N T ER E S T :
February 8: Campus
Connections| Benson 401 |
8:45—10:00 am
February 16: Truth, Lies, and
Politics | Wait Chapel |
7:00 pm
February 17-18: Secrest
Artists Series presents a
double feature of David
Finckel, Wu Han & Phil Set-
zer| Brendle Recital Hall|
7:30 PM
February 18: Founders’ Day
Convocation | Wait Chapel |
4:00 pm
February 20: Tedx WakeFor-
estU| Wait Chapel | 12:00-
4:00 pm
March 14-18: Global Wake
Week
Message from the Provost...
Wake Forest in Winston-Salem
When Wake Forest moved to Winston-Salem in 1956, the city staged a welcoming ceremony. Then
-mayor Marshall Kurfees (described at his retirement—after a record six terms in office—as a “can-
do populist, scorned by the power structure and belittled by the press”) remarked that “The rela-
tionship with Wake Forest could well be the most important of any for this city in years to come.”
Time has borne out Mayor Kurfees’s comment, as our combined Reynolda campus and Medical
Center are the largest employer in Forsyth County; our students, faculty, and staff make up more
than 10,000 local residents; and Wake Foresters are deeply engaged in our surrounding communi-
ty, often under the Pro Humanitate banner, in myriad ways.
As longtime Deacons know well and newcomers quickly discover, this remains a most welcoming
city in many ways, with a host of charms, quirks, and delights. It is also a deeply impoverished one.
Forsyth County lags behind others in the state (see chart below) on many dimensions, as does Win-
ston-Salem behind fellow mid-size cities like Durham, Greensboro, and Asheville. Having chaired
the Mayor’s Poverty Thought Force since October, I’m far more aware than previously of the
depths of income inequality, segregation,
and limited access to basic needs—
housing, health care, food, shelter—for
many of our Winston-Salem neighbors.
As our students, staff, and faculty contin-
ue to engage in our surrounding commu-
nities, it is imperative that we coordinate
campus efforts as much as possible, and
work with city and county officials, non-
profit groups, local businesses, and con-
cerned citizens to identify ways Wake
Forest can be a sustained positive force
for improvement. We in the Office of the
Provost are taking steps to help organize
that integrative capacity, with concrete
announcements forthcoming this semes-
ter. If you are already working with our
Winston-Salem and Forsyth County
neighbors who may need a helping hand,
as is a major effort of our Pro Humanitate
Institute among other university offices,
we welcome your partnership.
If you are interested in getting involved, please contact me, Sam Perrotta Turner at
perrotsm@wfu.edu, or Norma-May Isakow at
isaknm@wfu.edu.
Proportion of Residents Below Poverty Threshold, 2015
(Source: Forsyth Futures)
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