I N S I D E T H I S
I S S U E : :

Aspiring
Leaders
Program
2014-15
concludes

2

2015-16 Secrest
Artists
Series

season
announced

3

Summer online

undergraduate
courses

4

Provost’s
Newsletter

M A Y 7 , 2 0 1 5

V O L U M E 3 , I S S U E 4

S P E C I A L D A T E S
O F I N T E R E S T :

May
8: Faculty/Staff

Social | Zick’s

4:00-5:30 p.m.

May
17: Baccalaureate
Service | Wait
Chapel
11:00 am

May
18: Graduation
Exercises | Hearn
Plaza

9:00 am

August 25: First Day
of
Classes

August 25: THRIVE

Manchester Plaza

Message from the Provost...

The
inevitable
references,
this
as
each
April, to
‘cruelest month’
miss
Eliot’s
more
hopeful
next Waste
Land line:
“breeding/Lilacs
out of
the
dead
land.”
The time of
lilacs
is,
across
Wake
Forest,
a
season
of
budgets
and
banquets.
On
the
budgetary
side,
we
are
wrapping up
the
fiscal year
and
planning for the
next,
as
a
cacophony
of
numbers streams
from
finance
managers
to
and
from our budget offices.
Meanwhile
celebratory
events
spring forth,
honoring faculty
research/creative
work; the newly-tenured
and –promoted; the
year’s
memorable
accomplishments
across
all our departments,
schools,
and
staff
teams; bidding Godspeed
to
retiring members
of
the
WFU family; readying for Commencement. All
these make
up
a
flurry
that
leaves
April seeming to
fade
almost before
it
begins.
Budgets
for the
coming year
are
tight: an
eternal lament on
campus,
dating back
as
long as
anyone
can
recall.
Continued
national downward
pressure
on
college
costs,
combined
with
our determination
to
enhance
broad
access
to
a
Wake
Forest education,
has tuition/fees
(across
all our schools) increasing at
record-low rates.
Glancing backwards
in
time,
the
College
saw a
run
of
six straight
years
of double-digit
tuition
increases
in
the
late 1980s/early
‘90s,
and
routinely approached
8% just a few
years
ago. Next
year
will mark
our second
straight
at just above
3%;
the
last tuition
increase
this
low was in
1979, when
a change
of
zero
was
hastily
followed
the
next
year
by
a
20%
boost.
These
are
tough
trends
at an
institution
as
tuition-dependent as Wake
Forest. On
the
positive side,
our
average
undergraduate
debt decreased
last year,
contrary
to
most peer schools—a shift fuelled
in
part
by
scholarship
contributions
to
the
Wake
Will
campaign.
We
have
also
made
do
with
less
in
our oper-
ating budget,
with
the
‘Strategic Resource
Initiative’
(SRI) now
saving $7.4 million
annually—none
of
which cuts
were
to
our academic enterprise.
As
Hof
Milam
announced
last week in
his
annual budget report,
pressing facilities
needs (beginning with
Hearn
Plaza residence
halls
and
stretching across
campus
in
every
direction) have
us working to
create
an
additional $15 million
in
the
annual University
operating budget—which currently
tops
$350 million.
Another $10 million
or so
will be
earmarked
for new
or enhanced
academic programming—a boon
to
so
many
who
have
tightened belts
or postponed
creative
ideas.
Securing those
additional millions
will require
both
financial discipline
and
flourishing new
revenue
streams.
As
described
in
my
last newsletter as well as
address
to
campus
earlier this month,
‘History
of
the
Future’
exercises
across
campus
have
yielded
a
wealth of
promising ideas on
both
fronts.
From
a
new
set of
high-school institutes
launching in
Charlotte
this summer to
the
tax-credit-aided
program
ideas at Wake
Forest Innovation
Quarter, coming months
and
years
promise
a
fruitful season
of
finan-
cial improvements.
As
we
work
through
with
faculty,
staff, and
student leaders
an
array
of
notions
both
immediate-term
and
on
the
more distant horizon,
hopes
run
more towards
lilac-like
blooms
than
April’s
cruelty.

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