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taking time for self is very critical when you work with the fast-paced frenzy of many people
passing through your life. The quiet time becomes a touchstone for centering and many
freelancers in this project mention needing recovery time to regroup and regain their
creative mojo. Freelancers recognized long ago that harnessing and balancing their energy
is critical to performance. This idea is slowly gaining momentum and in a Harvard Business
Review Blog entitled “Share This With Your CEO,” Tony Schwartz (founder and CEO of The
Energy Project) suggests that in business we are witnessing a personal energy crisis:
Energy, after all, is the capacity to do the work. In the face of relentlessly rising
demand, fueled by digital technology and the expectation of instant 24/7
responsiveness, employees around the world are increasingly burning down their
energy reserves and depleting their capacity.
(http://blogs.hbr.org/schwartz/2012/06/share-this-with-your-ceo.html)
Schwartz recognizes the growing disconnect between the high energy demand required of
the workforce and the return:
The vast majority of organizations and CEOs have failed to fully appreciate
the connection between how well they take care of their employees; how
energized, engaged and committed those employees are as a result; how well
they take care of clients and customers; and how well they perform over time.
(http://blogs.hbr.org/schwartz/2012/06/share-this-with-your-ceo.html)
Freelancers, early on, recognized the physical and mental demands of creative work and
know how to recalibrate, rest, and appreciate their freedom during leaner times. These
generative practices are also discussed in “The Generative Years: Living What’s Next.”
This running on empty phenomenon is a professional liability for the entire workforce, but
deadly for the freelancer who must continually recharge their creative juices while staying
open to new opportunities. As Carol Beck, a videographer says, “The hardest thing about
freelance is finding time in the day to be good to yourself to exercise, to meditate, to
make healthy meals. to do those things you need to maintain balance. That’s the hardest
part.”
Here the idea of liminality can be repositioned in a full body context to include replenishing
our emotional, spiritual and physical reservoir as an anchoring device. The idea of creating
a generative work environment is an emerging trend that stellar companies recognize and
incorporate in their culture which includes: offering healthy food, on-site fitness, flexible
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