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the next place and never have a steady income” (Interchange 2009). Click to listen to the
entire Mark Deuze interview with host Deb Kent WFHB Radio podcast, (Available 2011
http://www.wfhb.org/news/interchange-mark-deuze-living-media):
With the current economic structure of media depending on a contingent workforce, the
consideration of media as a career should be weighed if you are not self-propelled or do
not have a practice that allows you to recalibrate or reach out to friends, family and
community (e.g. spiritual renewal, meditation, yoga, exercise, etc.). The prescription for
relaxation and social inclusion is critical for all forms of work but for freelancers it is essential
to spend time connecting with others for both professional and personal enhancement. If
you are balancing the needs of family, it is important to consider the precarious nature of
the business in terms of time, scheduling, and budget.
The Rewards: Compensation Is More Than Monetary
Carol Beck (Videographer): “If I’m Going To Work For Someone That’s
Messed Up I’m Going To Work For Me”
Carol Beck initially wanted to be an independent filmmaker and also have an academic
career. There was a short period of time when she did both before becoming a tenure
casualty. 
“I decided to not pursue academia at the time even though I loved and enjoyed
teaching. With an academic teaching background, Carol needed to prove that her
production skills could translate to the commercial
world:   
 
I decided to come to Atlanta and I tried to find work. It became clear that I was
absolutely overqualified for anything that was an interim job. No one in the industry
could extrapolate my academic experience as it applied to doing production work in
the quote unquote ‘real world’ and I would go through all these machinations
yes, I handled budgets yes, I handled equipment rooms and on and on. I was 33
and then I finally was hired by a woman who ran a small production company at a
wage that was less than what I made as an adjunct my first year out of college so
this is ten years later. So I essentially decided to look at it as a paid internship so I
could figure out how the production community worked in Atlanta. Otherwise, I
was going to make myself crazy because the woman I was working for was
intelligent. However, she had absolutely no management skills and was not a good
director. Again, it became an absolutely untenable position and I decided to hang
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