3
THE PORT BATH/ST. EUSTATIA CONNECTION
The above 1781 print show a London coffee house with London merchants reading aloud gazette news about vessels clearing colonial
ports with cargo from the “plantations.” In fact the well-known Lloyds of London shipping list of colonial ship arrivals and departures
was started at Lloyd’s
mid-18th
century coffee house. Merchants called all English colonies “plantations” at the time, including West
Indian, American and Canadian colonies. According to a Port Bath report the Dutch Caribbean island of St. Eustatius was the fifth of
six top-ranking cargo destinations to and from Port Bath (2.5% inbound and 6% outbound).*
Image source:
http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/collection_object_details/collection_image_gallery.aspx?assetId=32118300
1&objectId=1636863&partId= Retrieved August 1, 1715.
Data source St. Eustatius and Port Bath: a state archives bar chart dated 16 July 2004 by Richard Lawrence, retrieved state archives
and history office 7/7/15. Percentages of top six ports listed in Port Bath’s 1761-1794 records, based on vessels clearing Port Bath
customs inbound/outbound %:
Philadelphia 16.5/14.2% New York 18.3/12.2% Charleston 6.2/11.4%
Baltimore 8.6/ 7.7% St. Eustatius 2.5/ 6.0% * Boston 4.4/ 2.4 %
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