4 5
April-August
Assessment
1Assess
and understand
the current state of
University technology
and support services; identify
gaps in capability and
opportunities for improvement;
develop a focus for planning in
the next phase.
September-May
Planning
2Establish
recommendations for
each of the five planning
areas, along with a prioritized list
of major investments required
over the next two years to present
to the Provost and Executive Vice
President.
2016
Implementation
3Develop
a multi-year
implementation plan
for each of the five
planning areas with built-in cycles
for ongoing re-evaluation and
updating.
A PHASED
APPROACH
ONE PHASE AT A TIME
The three phases of the strategic plan are highlighted below. Learn more at our website,
http://itplan.wfu.edu
Awide
pril of 2015 saw the
beginning of a campus-
initiative to plan the
future of Wake Forest University’s
information technology
strategy. This planning process
encompassed our entire
campus community, aiming to
generate ideas that improve the
use of technology to support
institutional priorities, and to
define roadmaps for building
the organizational and technical
capabilities required.
Tand
he first phase - assessment
of the University’s academic
administrative
technologies, infrastructure,
information technology
governance, and efficiency -
yielded several key findings which
were refined into five planning
areas:
Cplan
onstructing an academic
technology investment
to enhance classrooms,
software, labs, and collaboration
spaces, to support faculty
and students, in keeping with
priorities for future teaching,
research, and learning.
CFinance,campus,Resources,
ollaborating with multiple
areas of including
Human
and Student offices, to determine
the various options for improving
administrative technology to
best service and support the WFU
community.
Pforecasting,infrastructure,
lanning for
including financial
to ensure
our ability to support and
sustain the growing demand
for core technologies and
strategic initiatives, including
WFU STRATEGIC
TECHNOLOGY PLAN
incorporating cloud technologies.
Rto
evising IS current
governance structure
create a uniform
process for project approval
and prioritization that aligns
funding new strategies and
maintaining current initiatives.
Within governance and funding
planning, clarifying roles and
responsibilities between IS
and distributed information
technology groups.
Win
orking internally to
maximize efficiency,
project, resource,
problem, and incident
management, including
generating short- and long-
term organizational plans for
IS and distributed information
technology groups.
“This is a very exciting time at Wake Forest as we explore the best ways to use
information technology to enhance our core mission of teaching, learning and
research”.
Hof Milam
Executive Vice President
Wake Forest University
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